What is the first sentence of your work-in-progress?  Post it here, and get feedback from your fellow She Writers about whether your opening line leaves them wanting more.  And don't forget to take some time to read other writers' first words, too.

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Evan Vander’s face immediately beguiled others, but it took time, vulnerability and external circumstances for the fascination to affect Angel as well.
While I can't say there is anything wrong with this sentence, I feel like I would need the next line in order to decide if I were interested enough to read further.
Over the years, she must have heard or read that dozens of his admirers said he was handsome but when she first met him, she did not notice.
I'm also struggling to pinpoint what about this sentence trips me up.  I had to read through it a few times, and I'm still confused about what precisely Angel thinks about Evan.  "time, vulnerability, and external circumstances" are vague ideas that confuse me, but don't tell me in what way Evan is beguiling...or not.  I guess instead of hinting at what Angel does NOT see...I wonder what DOES she see?  Can you paint a picture for the reader of Evan through Angel's eyes?  Is his apparent handsomeness even worth mentioning in sentence #1 if she doesn't notice?  Just some things to think about :)

I am still working on my entry. Before this revision, it read:

Angel Chávez never stopped thinking about Evan Vander.

People remembered Evan as a handsome man. Over the years, she must have heard or read that dozens of his admirers said he was handsome, but when Angel first met him, she did not notice. Evan's face immediately beguiled others, but it took time, vulnerability and external circumstances for the fascination to affect her as well. 

 

I have no problem with the way you use the word "handsome." In your description I see no "showing/telling" conflict here because you use a third person view. I'd say this works great for a romance story.

I think I like your original version better. Maybe you could do something that sets up a conflict faster (this is just off the top of my head, and since I don't know anything about Evan, its hard to come up with an example. But...):

Some people called him athletic. Others, mostly women, called him handsome. Evan Vander didn't rightly care what he was called - as ego had never been his problem.

Money, on the other hand, was a different issue...

Yes!  See if you can show "handsome" without actually using that word.  Handsome, as you've hinted at in your opening, is a subjective quality, and not everyone agrees what it is.
I see where opening lines can be out of context. "Handsome" is used subjectively here. The first 2 lines serve as part of an opening soliloquy for the protagonist before the first scene in the first chapter. It continues with her regrets about being "beguiled" by someone who is less than genuine and had questionable intentions when they first met.
Drop the 'as well."
THANKS (so obvious, no?)
    Staring down at the pictures that have arrived anonymously in the mail on this hot August afternoon, I am not sure what to make of them.

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