(This post is currently featured on The Quilting Gallery, so be sure to read it to see more photos and enter in the contest to win an ebook copy of Butter in the Well  for your Kindle.)

Isn’t it funny how we used “old bedding” when we were growing up, and now realize how valuable these antique quilts are due to the work and love put into each of them?

This fall I moved my parents from the farm they had called home for 65 years to a smaller home in town.

Because my parents didn’t have room for two trunks of quilts, I was lucky to inherit them. Inside these wooden chests were the handmade quilts, made by my great grandmother and grandmother, which we had used on our own beds when I was young.

My childhood years in the 1960s were spent in a wood frame house built back in 1870. This house was featured in my Butter in the Well book series. The only heat for my upstairs bedroom came from a floor vent, which let a little warmth drift up from the room below. Therefore, during the winter months, there were “blanket sheets” on my bed, plus three or four quilts on top.

Then I grew up, left home, and started using the light modern blankets on my bed.

Looking through the inherited quilts again brought back many memories. Not only of the quilts, but other flashes—like tucking my feet up inside the flowered flannel nightgown I wore to bed, pink sponge curlers, and having only my nose sticking out from under the pile of bedding.

Now I think of how I treated those quilts that we had used for everyday bedding, and am amazed that they survived.

Pink quilt used by author Linda Hubalek while growing up in the "Butter in the Well" house.(Pink quilt used by Linda Hubalek while growing up in the “Butter in the Well” house)

I marvel at the thousands of tiny handmade stitches and the variety and colors of the fabric—all scraps from past clothing of my ancestors.

How many hours did the quilters spend cutting out the block pieces, and then sewing them together?

Who sat around the quilting frame to quilt them?

What was the conversation those days back in the late 1800s and early 1900s?

Did these women ever consider their handwork would keep their decedents warm after they were gone? Or that I would treasure these quilts and the memories of the quilters a century later?

Just think, whether it was a hundred years ago—or present time—a quilt made by someone’s hand, is keeping another person warm.

How valuable is that? Priceless…

Views: 14

Tags: books, fiction, historical, hubalek, linda, memories, pioneer, quilts, women

Comment

You need to be a member of She Writes to add comments!

Join She Writes

Latest Activity

Tory McCagg commented on the blog post '[SWP: Behind the Book] Cross-country Whistle Stop Book Tour with Flash Readings Part Three!'
"Dylan, I just read Ann Patchett's book This is the Story of a Happy Marriage. She reads her book aloud to a friend when she is "done" with it. Wow. Now I know the depth and lack of patience I have allowed my writing! Again, lessons…"
20 minutes ago
Tory McCagg commented on the blog post '[SWP: Behind the Book] Cross-country Whistle Stop Book Tour with Flash Readings Part Three!'
"Typos. I don't know what to think. I looked through the first draft of the manuscript I sent in to She Writes and the February 29, 1948 was correct. Somewhere along the line of edits, it got changed. No clue and am not going to spend the time…"
21 minutes ago
Sandra Rodriguez Barron liked Karoline Barrett's discussion Book News!
39 minutes ago
Sandra Rodriguez Barron commented on the group 'Connecticut Writers'
"Hi everyone. This group is not dynamic/interactive so Sonya Huber created a secret page of CT Women WRiters on Facebook. If you wish to be included, please either send me your email to barronesa@hotmail.com or contact me via facebook at Sandy…"
40 minutes ago

Members

Badge

Loading…

© 2014   Created by Kamy Wicoff.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service