Tsuris (noun): trouble, aggravation, or misery

      I’ve just completed a memoir in essays I’m calling, How I Lost My Bellybutton and Other Naked Survival Stories, in which I try to make sense of the ridiculous amount of tsuris I’ve had in my fifty-seven years. As I begin sending it out into a publishing world that’s become quite weird, I’m feeling surprisingly Buddhist. Of course I want to entertain, illuminate, and move others with published work, but finding and telling my own story in my authentic voice, sometimes using my (recovered) sense of humor, has helped me accept that I actually write to survive. Writing is my solace, therapy, coping tool, refuge, calming mechanism, path to healing, and way to make sense of life.

      So what have I survived? Well, who’s counting, but just for starters we’re talking a husband’s brain tumor (1 time), the same husband’s cancer (2 times), my own miscarriages (3 times), breast cancer and a mastectomy whose aftermath nearly killed me (1 time, so far), a brother who thinks he’s the Angel of Philadelphia from the Bible (He’s not unlovable, but 1 deluded brother is plenty), and familial mental illness that I realize now pervaded every corner of our house in the Philadelphia suburbs, however in denial my father was. (3 mad aunts, 2 depressed parents).
      None of it comes even close to the 1994 death of my three-year-old son, Michael. Surviving that is, I believe, one of the two greatest accomplishments of my life.
      My relationship with writing has been explosive and fickle, beginning when I wrote to cope as a teenager, secretly. Like a junkie who keeps going into rehab, only to relapse every time, I’ve stopped when I lost focus on process, suffered rejection, envied another writer’s talent or success, had to abandon a project that didn’t work out, didn’t realize that everything you do, even that which fails or hurts, can teach.
     I’ve even condemned and ridiculed my Muse without mercy, beaten the poor thing over the head until she shuts down, rebels, abandons me, or even hits back. Here's a Survival Tip She-writers might find useful:

 

             Survival Tip #1: Do not beat your muse. She's sensitive, and doesn't respond well to bullying. Who does?

      Even during my most successful period, when I had multiple book deals, foreign translations, a German best seller, film options, nice sales, great reviews, I kept beating my Muse for not being better, and trying to quit.

     And then came December 7th, 1993, my version of Pearl Harbor Day, the day my son had a seizure. My husband and I rushed him to a Hospital, but we arrived with our baggage in Hell. 

     At the time of my son’s death I had a two-book contract that I tried to fulfill by frantically finishing the second book in a few weeks. What a sight I must have been, pounding on the computer, a wild-eyed zombie—in a bathrobe, since I hardly ever got dressed. The editor rejected that violent mess of a book, and I lost my deal.
     Was I thinking I could plow through such a loss, or maybe put off grief until later? This kind of grief makes you insane. And in my insanity, I stopped writing again, just when I needed it most.
     I spent the next three years walking around wearing only my bathrobe and my grief, only vaguely aware of my daughter and husband, like floaters in my field of vision. People suggested I write a journal, but I became enraged at anyone who presumed to tell me how to cope. One desperate day three years later, I scrawled the words “Help me” over and over in a notebook until they dissolved into unrecognizable strokes. Eventually I turned that journal into my unconventional third novel, Saving Elijah. Writing that book saved my life. Even so, when my next novel didn’t sell to a publisher, I gave up writing again.  Here's another tip:

 

          Survival Tip #2: Rejection and failure come with the territory.  Art is subjective and interactive. 

       I went back to school for social work, and now have a clinical practice I love. I also facilitate “write to heal” workshops. And writing lured me back, first poetry to cope with the trauma of sitting with other people’s trauma, and then after surviving the breast cancer (barely), I started the bellybutton essay, to which I added Other Naked Survival Stories, including several about my son, what Hell is like, how I escaped it. The book is part memoir, part self help, with 70 or so Survival Tips based on all I’ve learned about psychology, resilience, and coping with emotional pain. Writing the tips—the real ones and even the bits of shtick I threw in for fun—was instructive for me, and I hope will be for readers, too. Here are a few tips more for writers that aren't in the book:

 

      Survival Tip #3: Banish all self-censorship, whether you’re “writing-for-healing,” or writing a first draft.

      Survival Tip #4: Draw blood. This is the (oddly) healing part. Corollary: It helps to examine and unpack your psychological baggage when you're forced to deal with trauma, and/or when working with it in your writing.

      Survival Tip #5: Learn craft. Learn more. Craft (and even art) comes with practice and study, and with a willingness to write and rewrite, examine and reexamine the material (along with your mind and heart) to shape it so it resonates emotionally with other readers. Corollary for Older Writers: Do not be dismayed that on the Internet, your writing is called “content.” Fuss with it anyway. Writers fuss because they care about each word.

      Survival Tip #6: Learn to distinguish between criticism or honest reaction, and snark. Criticism can help you in your work. Snark is about the person giving it. Corollary: Don’t become overly fond of your words, but learn to stand your ground on the words that work.

      Survival Tip #7: Tell the truth. Or your truth, anyway. But don’t expect to be thanked. Corollary: To tell your truth, find your authentic voice.

      Survival Tip #8: Count your blessings. One blessing is that you have the gift of writing to see you through this life.

      Semi-reformed cynic that I am, I feel blessed to have been able to use my writing to see myself as a survivor, rather than as victim of emotional (not to mention physical) suffering. I’ll be thrilled if readers find my new book moving, wise, funny, and (God forbid) inspirational, but whatever happens out there in the big bad publishing world, I know that I can no sooner give up writing than give up my nose. I’m definitely keeping my nose, since I no longer have a bellybutton. As for how, exactly, I lost my bellybutton, that, Sister She Writers, is a long story, which I hope you’ll read about in the memoir.

      Writing Prompt: Here’s an idea I explored in my novel, Saving Elijah. I recommend it for anyone who’s suffered trauma, loss, illness, or emotional pain. (That would be just about everyone!) With all the creativity and imagination in She-Writes-Land, I trust we’ll see some interesting results. Post and tag your efforts so we can all enjoy them.
      Imagine a scene in which you (or a character) meet God, or God’s emissary. Place the scene in any era: the 1950’s or 1500’s, the future, now. Any locale: France, Detroit, your kitchen, the New York Stock Exchange, a dusty road. Dress God in any guise: someone meaningful from your (or the character’s) past, a dead father, a purple angel or demon, a crooked old man. Now write the scene, with dialogue. You might (but don’t have to) start with your character imploring to God, “Why me?”
      Why me, indeed.

Views: 84

Tags: #nonfiction, #process/craft, essay, memoir, survivor

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Comment by Elizabeth Towns on April 8, 2011 at 6:44pm

This was amazing. I especially needed this Survival Tip #3: Banish all self-censorship, whether you’re “writing-for-healing,” or writing a first draft.

 

I actually got the same tip from listening to She Writes Radio today, and this second inference just impresses on me that much more. I am doing that now

Comment by Sabine A.Reed on April 6, 2011 at 12:08am

An inspiring post. I hope your book sells and does well!

Comment by Diane Amento Owens on April 5, 2011 at 1:28pm
Love tip #6 and your observation that "snark is about the person giving it." I prefer to use the less negative term "feedback" rather than criticism so I liked that you framed criticism as "honest reaction."  Great post and prompt! Thank you.
Comment by Irene Roth on April 5, 2011 at 10:26am
Hello!
Comment by Leigh Caron on April 4, 2011 at 3:55am
I lost my bellybutton too, but it doesn't compare to your loss. A very inspiring post.
Comment by Binnie Klein on April 2, 2011 at 4:59am
I enjoyed this post. It was refreshingly honest and witty! I have read Fran's previous books, so I know that her new project will be great.  I am looking forward to sitting down with her provocative writing prompt idea. You know it's a good one when it makes you feel a little...nervous.
Comment by Kelley Clink on April 1, 2011 at 3:20pm
Whoa!  Great post!  I have to say I am thoroughly intrigued, and hope your memoir comes out soon.

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