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  • Social Media’s ‘Unexpected Gifts’: A Poet’s Story
Social Media’s ‘Unexpected Gifts’: A Poet’s Story
Contributor
Written by
Ami Mattison
February 2011
Contributor
Written by
Ami Mattison
February 2011

I tell people, the best way to learn about me is through my writing. ~ Maureen Doallas

For today’s guest post, I asked poet Maureen E. Doallas to share her story of the recent publication of her debut book of poetry. Enjoy!

I bought my first computer in 2000 but until I retired in 2007 and started an art-related business, Transformational Threads, I had a tiny virtual footprint, restricting my online activity to business-related activities, e-mails to family and friends, and following correspondent Leroy Siever’s daily narrative about his cancer experience at “My Cancer” (now, since Sievers’ death,  “OurCancer”). There, I posted a lot, including new poetry I had begun writing after my late brother became ill. (I wrote an essayabout the very real, if virtual, community that is shared there.)

Sometime in mid-2009, I joined FaceBook and LinkedIn. While browsing through search results for poetry groups, I came across Seedlings in Stone, one of poet L.L. Barkat’s blogs, where I found a link to Random Acts of Poetry (RAP).

Reading the contributors’ poems, I thought how fun it would be to participate, so I e-mailed L.L., managing editor for The High Calling, asking how I could join the group. Well, that required a blog or other online site from which to share and link.

So I created Writing Without Paper, which I decided to use as my hub to write about anything that brings me joy, especially art, artists, and poetry.

Later that same month, I joined Twitter, to take part in Twitter poetry jams, and began following group members’ blogs, tweeting my own posts, and generally reaching out to expand online connections among diverse communities of writers and artists who share my interests.

Some of my new friends created a dedicated place for all things poetry, TweetSpeakPoetry. That led in 2010 to L.L.’s founding of T.S. Poetry Press, publication of TSPP’s first books, and, serendipitously, an invitation to publish my own poetry. Read the rest of the article at poetryNprogress.

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Comments
  • Ami Mattison

    Thanks, Cathy and Deborah, for reading and commenting. I'm so glad that the guest post resonated for you. I'm pleased and honored to have Maureen share her story with my readers.

  • Maureen E. Doallas

    Cathy and Deborah, 

     

    Thank you both for your kind and generous words.

     

    The book's title is taken from one of my poems in the collection. I was introduced to Neruda's work when I began learning Spanish in the 7th grade and continued my studies into college. My Spanish is a bit rusty now but I still read Neruda and always will. The title poem is my response to my deep reading and love of the writer. It's among the few "old" poems in the book that I reworked a bit. My friend Diane Walker set it to her artwork and narration in a video on Ami's site.

     

    The artwork is titled "The Assumption of the Virgin". It's a wonderful painting by my Oregon friend Randall David Tipton. He's offering a special edition signed print of the painting. Go here if you're interested: 

    http://randall-tiptondailypaintingsstore.blogspot.com/

     

    Thank you again for reading and commenting, and for your support.

  • Deborah Batterman

    Indeed, the best way to learn about a writer is through her writing. Thank you, Ami, for this guest post by Maureen Doallas. I admit it -- the title (I'm a fan of Neruda) and the gorgeous cover -- are a draw. What Maureen writes about her evolution as a poet sealed the deal re: my interest in the book. And I would heartily agree -- "If even one person who reads the collection is moved by a single poem, then I have published for the best, and right, reason." Congratulations, Maureen.