• Irma Gonzalez
  • CATEGORY 3 HURRICANE IN MY HEAD/ SAN CIPRIAN 1932, AS TOLD TO ME, by LP LAURA MARIA PEREZ PACHECO
CATEGORY 3 HURRICANE IN MY HEAD/ SAN CIPRIAN 1932, AS TOLD TO ME, by LP LAURA MARIA PEREZ PACHECO
Contributor
Written by
Irma Gonzalez
February 2010
Contributor
Written by
Irma Gonzalez
February 2010
Sunday, September 07, 2008

Current mood: vexed
Category: Blogging
: my good mother told me that when she was 4, she looked through a 2nd floor window of a brick bldg. that belonged to a grocer her mother knew well enough to ask for safety during a category 3 hurricane that cycloned through puerto rico in 1932. San Ciprian. San Ciprian ripped through La Calle Ponce de Leon and tore up the villages from Rio Piedras, past the Sunoco gas station, all the way through until it flew itself out and 3 days later landed on softer feet in Santo Domingo and basically unscathed Haiti.
Her mother was smart to go on up there and ask if the two of them could stay inside the Bodegero's quarters. She said there were a few others that were staying out the storm there. She said the storm (hurukan) outside the window was crazy. As a well spoken kid, she couldn't stop talking all her ooos, and lord, have mercies! When she returned to her house, she had none. The little house was destroyed. It used to have a dirt floor and blankets. Now she had nothing but blankets from the Red Cross. They felt obliged to give her many many blankets after they accidentally took the life of my mom's father. With a 3 category hurricane, the Red Cross truck had practically pounced on the poor man, spewing his small compra he was carrying for his family...mami says that her mother refused the food, when the Red Cross retrieved it for her. Her man was dead, but the food had survived the violent hit. The tapas were still on and everything. She said no. She wouldn't eat food that he had bought and carried for her. Food that he had died for. Mami says that the Red Cross used to bring blankets and Klim, a dried milk that had to be mixed with water. She became in love with that Klim milk. Back and back, its a backwards read frontwards word. What a palindrome, Madam I'm Adam. Indeed
.
The irony of this story is the next installation that i must tell u about. when my mom was born, it was 1928. she was born in halloween. oct 31.
That year there were numerous storms that season in Puerto Rico. As a happy and yet unlucky child as she had been, my mother went to surprise her mom (which is not my grandmother by blood, she was someone who raised her and loved her, since her true dad disowned her and forbade anyone to let her back into the house, so her uncle and his wife raised her,) so she crossed a school street and nearly got killed by a bus that had no breaks. It was a miracle that she survied that bus hit, being so little, Kindergarten and all,) so when she was in that hurricane in 1932, she was quite accustomed to her lack of her left arm which the bus had taken from her. So imagine this Whirlwind Woman Child: blonde, green-eyed, white-spanish heritage, talky, talky, talky, "oooh mami , the storm para qui y por alla! Ay! Dios mio! Andale! Que malo es! " and so on. So the real true irony is? that her father (not even my real grandfather, because that dude was the one who tossed mami out, this was the brother! the one who took her in, dedicating a radio song, "Laura, eres, pero no mia") was killed, hit by a vehicle on that same block where her arm was took. ain't that a ... uh uh uh uh watch your mouth! Ain't that a kick in the head?





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