New Weekly Feature: ASK AN EDITOR, with Lea Beresford
Contributor
Written by
Deborah Siegel
August 2009
Writing
Contributor
Written by
Deborah Siegel
August 2009
Writing
I am pleased beyond belief to bring you a new weekly feature at the SHE WRITES Blog, "ASK AN EDITOR," penned by the Girl with the Red Pencil herself, Lea Beresford. So you know those questions you've always wanted to ask a professional editor but either didn't want to ask your own, or didn't know one to ask? You've got Lea now. Who is Lea? After a shaky start in the world of pharmaceutical advertising, Lea Beresford attended the Columbia Publishing Course. She worked under the illustrious Irene Skolnick at the Irene Skolnick Literary Agency and was then hired at Random House, where Kurt Vonnegut admitted that she was a sweetheart, John Updike praised her ad copy, and she discussed patent leather in the elevator with a certain spiritual luminary. She has edited literary fiction, gastronomic memoirs, a guide to tourism in space, and prickly true crime. She lives in Manhattan with her French bulldog, Ernest (a being of great importance, she says). We are thrilled that she has offered herself up to our SHE WRITES community. Please send your questions straight to Lea's SHE WRITES Inbox. Each week, she will choose a few and respond, here in this space. Stay tuned for the first post from Lea in just a few!

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Comments
  • Louise Fabiani

    Hi!
    I am a writer and copyeditor. It's not quite as fun as a book editor, I suppose (never having been the latter), and getting more and more frustrating. My questions: 1) do you find that people - even educated ones - are writing less and less accurately these days, as if guided by the belief that "as long as you know what I mean, why bother?" 2) if someone (such as myself) continues to adhere to grammatical rules, as well as write evocatively or poetically, does that confer an advantage or disadvantage in today's competitive book market? Thanks!