This blog was featured on 05/23/2019
10 Literary Magazines to Submit To
Contributor
Written by
She Writes
May 2019
Contributor
Written by
She Writes
May 2019

In today's world, great writing can be found just about anywhere. Talented people can capture an audiences' attention in an Instagram caption or a personal blog post. So when new writers are hoping to attract publishers, literary magazines may not be the first place they look. However, these old school publishing arenas are still a thriving ecosystem of talent and discovery. 

Tin House

Tin House is among one of the top online magazines in the literary world. This quarterly magazine publishes fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction by both new and established writers. With the reading period from September 4 to May 31, it's imperative to submit your work during this time. It is free to submit your work and if chosen, the magazine will pay you to publish your work.

Submit your work here. 

One Story

One story specializes in fiction, publishing one short story every three to four weeks. With a rolling submission period, they open the magazine up for submissions twice a year (January 15th - May 31st and September 3rd - November 14th). This magazine is looking for literary fiction between 3,000 and 8,000 words. Editors seek stories that can stand alone and leave readers satisfied. If you're a short story writer with work that has yet to be published elsewhere, this magazine will be one you want to submit your work to. If accepted, the magazine will pay writers for their work. 

Submit your work here.

Kenyon Review

Kenyon Review is one of the oldest and best literary magazines in the United States. With a reading period from September 15 - October 1, the print and digital magazine publishes works of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, plays and translations. This magazine tries to publish work from new voices in "traditionally underserved communities." The editors encourage writers to read what they currently publish to get a feel for whether or not the magazine is a good fit.

Submit your work here.

McSweeney's

When McSweeney's began publishing literary works, they focused on only publishing works that other magazines rejected. The rule has since been disbanded but since their beginning, they have published work from some of the best writers in the game–both new and established. With a long reading period (September 1 - May 31), the magazine accepts both works of fiction and nonfiction and publishes an issue quarterly. Another site that pays writers for their contributions, the best way to get your work published here is to get a feel for what they publish and determine whether or not your writing is something they'd be interested in. 

Submit your work here.

Poetry Foundation 

If you're a poet, this literary magazine should be at the top of your dream list. Focusing solely on poetry, this magazine accepts submissions all year round so there's no waiting for submission dates. Paying contributors $10/line if published, Poetry Foundation accepts original works that have yet to be published elsewhere. 

Submit your poetry here.

The Southampton Review

The Southampton Review is an online and print magazine that publishes work from both new and established authors but only takes the best of the best. This literary mag accepts short stories, novel excerpts, flash fiction, poetry and nonfiction. The magazine currently accepts submissions from August 1 - September 1 and January 1 - February 1. The Southampton Review is interested in voice-driven writing that takes risks with structure and content. They encourage writers to get familiar with their current issues before submitting.

Submit your work here.

TriQuarterly

TriQuarterly is the literary journal run out of Northwestern University. They are interested in "work that embraces the world and continues the ongoing global conversation about culture and society." The magazine accepts poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, video essays and hybrid work from both new and established writers. In addition, TriQuarterly accepts craft essays and interviews. If you'd like to submit for their Fall/Winter reading period, submit October - December. For their Spring submissions, you will need to submit March - May.

Submit your work here.

AGNI

AGNI is a literary magazine known for featuring new writers who submit fantastic work. With a submission period of September 1 - May 31, they're a magazine who publishes simultaneous submissions and looks for work that breaks out of the norm–the editors at AGNI want to read work that they believe no one else could have written. Keep in mind, a few genres they don't accept are: romance, horror, mystery and science fiction. This magazine accepts fiction, nonfiction and poetry.

Submit your work here.

North American Review

The oldest literary magazine in America, the North American Review was founded in 1815 and is one of the most respected literary magazines out there. The editors are looking for high-quality poetry, fiction, and nonfiction on any subject and accept submissions throughout the academic year. This magazine looks for stories with a strong narrative arc and poetry that is passionate about language and its subject matter.

Submit your work here.

Black Warrior Review

The Black Warrior Review was created in 1974 by the MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Alabama. Known for publishing works by Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winners, the magazine also publishes works by up-and-coming writers. This magazine encourages writers to submit interesting work that takes risks and has real heart. Black Warrior Review currently accepts poetry, fiction, nonfiction and graphic prose. The submission period for this magazine is December 1 - March 1 and June 1 - September 1.

Submit your work here.

If you submit to any of the above magazines, remember that patience is key. When it comes to literary magazines, it can take editors up to a year to get back to you about your work. While some editors can provide specific feedback for your writing, others will simply send an email letting you know that you have not been chosen. Like publishing, getting accepted by a literary magazine can be tricky. Make sure before submitting to any literary magazine that you study the requirements and also read what they have accepted in the past. 

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