Comments

  • Hi Wanda, no, this wouldn't be considered hybrid. A hybrid cannot be fiction and memoir because those are two distinct categories and booksellers do not like mixing them. I think only...
  • Brooke, as usual, your post is really helpful and clear.  Thanks!  But, I'm still confused:  Linda Joy Myers suggested I find a distinct category for what I'd been calling my "journali...
  • Great post, Nancy. I had the distinct pleasure of attending one of Mary Karr's lectures at UC Santa Barbara a few months ago. She not only connects on the page but even more so in per...
  • ...deas can help you stand out from the crowd than something that is less distinct. Here's what I suggest and yo...e--they're the same thing, but different. OR you can make it even more distinct; think Coke and Sprite. Sprit...
  • I really enjoyed this post and your distinct perspective. I think it's so important to write boldly what you are called to write, and to do it as clearly, and--well, this is my perspec...
  • ...es to "crutch" words is that the writer will use them regardless of who is talking. To me, that's a giveaway because the characters do not have a distinct voice of their own, so they s...
  • ...pace. I wrote about being a political action committee canvasser in northern Indiana and how going door to door throughout these towns with their distinct community centers in historic...
  • ...young adult work about a hate crime.  Once I figured out that it should in the "voice" of my main protaganist - Skylar Thompson- (my novel has 10 distinct first person points of view)...
  • ...pecially about your characters becoming your teachers.  When I was writing I had my characters "speaking" to me -- my debut YA novel, LIE, has 10 distinct first person points of view. ...
  • As a side question, do you plan to revisit the project of writing about your mother's life? It is very interesting to see you contrasting your own life goals and ambitions with your mother's, and the progress you each made that was so separate and distinct.